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Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Palestinian blue draft resolution in the Security Council

Draft Resolution (17 December 2014)

Reaffirming its previous resolutions, in particular resolutions 242 (1967); 338 (1973), 1397 (2002), 1515 (2003), 1544 (2004), 1850 (2008), 1860 (2009) and the Madrid Principles,

Reiterating its vision of a region where two democratic states, Israel and Palestine, live side by side in peace within secure and recognized borders,

Reaffirming the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination,

Recalling General Assembly resolution 181 (II) of 29 November 1947,

Reaffirming the principle of the inadmissibility of the acquisition of territory by force and recalling its resolutions 446 (1979), 452 (1979) and 465 (1980), determining, inter alia, that the policies and practices of Israel in establishing settlements in the territories occupied since 1967, including East Jerusalem, have no legal validity and constitute a serious obstruction to achieving a comprehensive, just and lasting peace in the Middle East,

Affirming the imperative of resolving the problem of the Palestine refugees on the basis of international law and relevant resolutions, including resolution 194 (III), as stipulated in the Arab Peace Initiative,

Underlining that the Gaza Strip constitutes an integral part of the Palestinian territory occupied in 1967, and calling for a sustainable solution to the situation in the Gaza Strip, including the sustained and regular opening of its border crossings for normal flow of persons and goods, in accordance with international humanitarian law,

Welcoming the important progress in Palestinian state-building efforts recognised by the World Bank and the IMF in 2012 and reiterating its call to all States and international organizations to contribute to the Palestinian institution building programme in preparation for independence,

Reaffirming that a just, lasting and peaceful settlement of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict can only be achieved by peaceful means, based on an enduring commitment to mutual recognition, freedom from violence, incitement and terror, and the two-State solution, building on previous agreements and obligations and stressing that the only viable solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is an agreement that ends the occupation that began in 1967, resolves all permanent status issues as previously defined by the parties, and fulfils the legitimate aspirations of both parties,

Condemning all violence and hostilities directed against civilians and all acts of terrorism, and reminding all States of their obligations under resolution 1373 (2001),

Recalling the obligation to ensure the safety and well-being of civilians and ensure their protection in situations of armed conflict,

Reaffirming the right of all States in the region to live in peace within secure and internationally recognized borders,

Noting with appreciation the efforts of the United States in 2013/14 to facilitate and advance negotiations between the parties aimed at achieving a final peace settlement, 

Aware of its responsibilities to help secure a long-term solution to the conflict,

1. Affirms the urgent need to attain, no later than 12 months after the adoption of this resolution, a just, lasting and comprehensive peaceful solution that brings an end to the Israeli occupation since 1967 and fulfills the vision of two independent, democratic and prosperous states, Israel and a sovereign, contiguous and viable State of Palestine living side by side in peace and security within mutually and internationally recognized borders;

2. Decides that the negotiated solution will be based on the following parameters:

  • borders based on 4 June 1967 lines with mutually agreed, limited, equivalent land swaps ;
  • security arrangements, including through a third-party presence, that guarantee and respect the sovereignty of a State of Palestine, including through a full and phased withdrawal of Israeli security forces which will end the occupation that began in 1967 over an agreed transition period in a reasonable timeframe, not to exceed the end of 2017, and that ensure the security of both Israel and Palestine through effective border security and by preventing the resurgence of terrorism and effectively addressing security threats, including emerging and vital threats in the region.
  • A just and agreed solution to the Palestine refugee question on the basis of Arab Peace Initiative, international law and relevant United Nations resolutions, including resolution 194 (III);
  • Jerusalem as the shared capital of the two States which fulfils the legitimate aspirations of both parties and protects freedom of worship;
  • an agreed settlement of other outstanding issues, including water;

3. Recognizes that the final status agreement shall put an end to the occupation and an end to all claims and lead to immediate mutual recognition;

4. Affirms that the definition of a plan and schedule for implementing the security arrangements shall be placed at the center of the negotiations within the framework established by this resolution;

5. Looks forward to welcoming Palestine as a full Member State of the United Nations within the timeframe defined in the present resolution;

6. Urges both parties to engage seriously in the work of building trust and to act together in the pursuit of peace by negotiating in good faith and refraining from all acts of incitement and provocative acts or statements, and also calls upon all States and international organizations to support the parties in confidence-building measures and to contribute to an atmosphere conducive to negotiations;

7. Calls upon all parties to abide by their obligations under international humanitarian law, including the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War of 12 August 1949;

8. Encourages concurrent efforts to achieve a comprehensive peace in the region, which would unlock the full potential of neighborly relations in the Middle East and reaffirms in this regard the importance of the full implementation of the Arab Peace Initiative;

9. Calls for a renewed negotiation framework that ensures the close involvement, alongside the parties, of major stakeholders to help the parties reach an agreement within the established timeframe and implement all aspects of the final status, including through the provision of political support as well as tangible support for post-conflict and peace-building arrangements, and welcomes the proposition to hold an international conference that would launch the negotiations;    

10. Calls upon both parties to abstain from any unilateral and illegal actions, including settlement activities, that could undermine the viability of a two-State solution on the basis of the parameters defined in this resolution;

11. Calls for immediate efforts to redress the unsustainable situation in the Gaza Strip, including through the provision of expanded humanitarian assistance to the Palestinian civilian population via the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East and other United Nations agencies and through serious efforts to address the underlying issues of the crisis, including consolidation of the ceasefire between the parties;  

12Requests the Secretary-General to report on the implementation of this resolution every three months;

13. Decides to remain seized of the matter.
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"French draft resolution": Israeli Palestinian Peace agreement within 2 years

This is the "French draft resolution on Palestinian Israeli peace talks" diplomats said. The French mission in New York did not confirm or deny that. 
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To read the Palestinian draft resolution, click here

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The Security Council , 
PP1. Reaffirming its previous resolutions, in particular resolutions 242 (1967), 338(1973) 1397 (2002), 1515 (2003), 1544 (2004), 1850 (2008), 1860 (2009) and the Madrid Principles,

PP2. Reiterating its vision of a region where two democratic states, Israe and Palestine, live side by side in peace within secure and recognized borders,

PP3. Reaffirming the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination,

PP4. Recalling General Assembly resolution 181 (II) of 29 November 1947 and its recommendation on the question of Palestine and the establishment of the independence of the Arab and Jewish States,

PP5. Reaffirming the principle of the inadmissibility of the acquisition of territory by force and recalling its resolutions, 446 (1979), 452 (1979) and 465 (1980), determining, inter alia, that the policies and practices of Israel establishing settlements in the territories occupied since 1967, including East Jerusalem, have no legal validity and constitute a serious obstruction to achieving a comprehensive, just and lasting peace in the Middle East, 

PP6. Underlining  that the Gaza Strip constitutes an integral part of the territory occupied in 1967 and will part of the Palestinian state and calling for a sustainable solution to the situation in the Gaza Strip,

PP7. Welcoming the important progress in Palestinian state-building efforts recognized by the  world bank and the IMF in 2012 and reiterating its call to all states and international organizations to contribute to the Palestinian institution building programme in preparation for statehood,

PP8. Reaffirming that a just, lasting and peaceful settlement of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict can only be bases on an enduring commitment to mutual recognition, freedom from violence, incitement and terror, and the two-state solution, building on previous agreements and obligations and stressing that the only viable solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is an agreement that ends the occupation that began in 1967, resolves all permanent status issues as previously defined by the parties and fulfills the aspirations of  both parties.

PP9. Condemning all violence and hostilities directed against civilians and all acts of terrorism, and reminding all States of their obligations under resolution 1373 (2001),

PP10. Reaffirming the right of all States in the region to live in peace within secure and recognized borders,

PP11. Noting with appreciation the efforts of the United States in 2013-14 to take forward negotiations aimed at final settlement,

PP12. Aware of the responsibilities to help secure a long term solution to the conflict, 

OP1. Affirms the urgent need to attain, no latter than 24 months after the adoption of this resolution, a just, lasting and comprehensive peaceful solution that fulfills the vision of two independent democratic and prosperous states, Israel and a sovereign contiguous and viable State of Palestine living side by side in peace and security within mutually and internationally recognized border;

OP2. Decides that the negotiated solution will be based on the following parameters:
-        borders based on 4 June 1967 with mutually agreed limited equivalent land swaps;
-        security agreements that respect the sovereignty of a non-militarized state of Palestine, including through a full phased withdrawal of Israeli security forces which will end the  occupation that began in 1967 over an agreed transition period in a reasonable timeframe, and that ensure the security of both Israel and Palestine through effectively with security threats including with new and vital threats in the region;
-        an agreed, just, fair, and realistic solution to the refugee question, including a viable mechanism to provide for reparation, resettlement, compensation and other agreed measures for a conclusive resolution;
-        Jerusalem as the shared capital of the two States which fulfills the aspirations of both parties and protects freedom and worship;
-        an agreed settlement of other outstanding issues, including water;

OP3. Recognizes that the final status agreement shall put an end to all claims to the occupation and lead to immediate mutual recognition;

OP4. Affirms that the definition of a plan and schedule for implementing the security arrangements shall be placed a the heart of the negotiations within the framework established by this resolution;

OP5. Looks forward to welcoming Palestine as a full member of the United Nations;

OP6. Urges both parties to engage seriously in the work of building trust and to act together in the pursuit of peace by negotiating in good faith and eschewing provocative acts or statements and also calls upon all states and international organizations to contribute to an atmosphere conductive to negotiations;

OP7. Encourages concurrent efforts to achieve a comprehensive peace in the region, which would unlock the full potential of neighborly relations in the Middle East and reaffirms in this regard, the importance of the full implementation of the Arab Peace initiative;

OP8. Calls for a renewed negotiation framework that the close involvement, alongside the parties, of major stakeholders, to provide political support as well as concrete support for post-conflict arrangements, to help the parties reach an agreement within the established timeframe and implement all aspects of the final status;

OP9. Calls upon both parties to abstain from any new actions, including settlement activities, that could undermine the viability of a two state solution on the basis of the parameters defined in this resolution;

OP10. Requests the Secretary General to report on the implementation of this resolution every three months.
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Monday, December 15, 2014

Resolution 2191 on Syria: Renewal of 2165

Australia, Jordan and Luxembourg circulated this draft resolution in the Security Council on Friday, 12 December 2014. 

11 December 2014
The Security Council,
PP1 Recalling its resolutions 2042 (2012), 2043 (2012), 2118 (2013), 2139 (2014), 2165 (2014) and 2175 (2014), and its Presidential Statements of 3 August 2011 (S/PRST/2011/16), 21 March 2012 (S/PRST/2012/6), 5 April 2012 (S/PRST/2012/10) and 2 October 2013 (S/PRST/2013/15),
PP2 Reaffirming its strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, unity and territorial integrity of Syria, and to the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations,
PP3 Expressing outrage at the unacceptable and escalating level of violence and the killing of more than 191,000 people, including well over 10,000 children, as a result of the Syrian conflict, as reported by the Secretary-General of the United Nations and his Special Representative for Children and Armed Conflict,
PP4 Gravely distressed by the continued deterioration of the devastating humanitarian situation in Syria and by the fact that now more than 12.2 million people in Syria - of whom 7.6 million are internally displaced, 4.5 million are living in hard-to-reach areas and 212,000 are trapped in besieged areas, including Palestinian refugees - require urgent humanitarian assistance, including medical assistance, and noting with concern that approximately one million more people have been displaced within Syria since the adoption of resolution 2165 (2014),
PP5 Gravely concerned at the lack of effective implementation of its resolutions 2139 (2014) and 2165 (2014) by the parties to the Syrian domestic conflict, recalling in this regard their legal obligations under international humanitarian law and international human rights law, as well as all the relevant decisions of the Security Council, including by ceasing all attacks against civilians and civilian objects, including those involving attacks on schools, medical facilities and the deliberate interruptions of water supply, the indiscriminate use of weapons, including artillery, barrel bombs and air strikes, indiscriminate shelling by mortars, car bombs, suicide attacks and tunnel bombs, as well as the use of starvation of civilians as a method of combat, including by the besiegement of populated areas, and the widespread use of torture, ill-treatment, arbitrary executions, extrajudicial killings, enforced disappearances, sexual and gender-based violence as well as all grave violations and abuses committed against children,
PP6 Expressing its grave concern that areas of Syria are under the control of the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) and Al Nusrah Front (ANF) and about the negative impact of their presence, violent extremist ideology and actions on stability in Syria and the region, including the devastating humanitarian impact on the civilian populations which has led to the displacement of hundreds of thousands of people, reaffirming its resolve to address all aspects of the threat posed by ISIL, ANF and all other individuals, groups, undertakings and entities associated with Al-Qaida, and calling for the implementation of Security Council resolutions 2170 (2014) and 2178 (2014), and its Presidential Statement of 28 July 2014 (S/PRST/2014/14),
PP7 Strongly condemning the arbitrary detention and torture of civilians in Syria, notably in prisons and detention facilities, as well as the kidnappings, abductions, hostage taking and forced disappearances, and demanding the immediate end of these practices and the release of all arbitrarily detained persons starting with women and children, as well as sick, wounded and elderly people including United Nations and humanitarian personnel and journalists,
PP8 Recalling its strong condemnation in resolution 2175 (2014) of all forms of violence and intimidation to which those participating in humanitarian operations are increasingly exposed, as well as attacks on humanitarian convoys and acts of destruction and looting of their assets, and its urging of all parties involved in an armed conflict to promote the safety, security and freedom of movement of humanitarian personnel and United Nations and its associated personnel and their assets, and urging that all parties to the Syrian domestic conflict must take all appropriate steps to ensure the safety and security of United Nations and associated personnel, those of its specialized agencies, and all other personnel engaged in humanitarian relief activities,
PP9 Noting that, despite all the challenges, the United Nations and their implementing partners continue to deliver life-saving assistance to millions of people in need, and taking note that hard-to-reach locations in Aleppo, Idleb, Quneitra and Dar’a have been reached since the adoption of resolution 2165 (2014) through humanitarian aid delivered across borders, stressing however in this regard that most people in hard-to-reach and besieged areas remain difficult for the UN and their implementing partners to reach with humanitarian assistance,
PP10 Expressing deep concern at the continuing and new impediments to the delivery of humanitarian assistance across borders and across conflict lines, encouraging the United Nations humanitarian agencies and their implementing partners to take steps to scale up humanitarian deliveries into hard-to-reach and besieged areas, including by using, as effectively as possible, border crossings under resolution 2165 (2014), and noting that the United Nations monitoring mechanism is operational and continuing its activities, including monitoring shipments and confirming their humanitarian nature, in accordance with resolution 2165 (2014),
PP11 Reaffirming the need to support the United Nations humanitarian agencies and their implementing partners in their efforts to expand the delivery of humanitarian assistance to reach all people in need in Syria, and further reaffirming its decision in resolution 2165 (2014) that all Syrian parties to the conflict shall enable the immediate and unhindered delivery of humanitarian assistance directly to people throughout Syria, by the United Nations humanitarian agencies and their implementing partners, on the basis of United Nations assessments of need and devoid of any political prejudices and aims, including by immediately removing all impediments to the provision of humanitarian assistance,
PP12 Noting the role that ceasefire agreements which are consistent with humanitarian principles and international humanitarian law can play in facilitating the delivery of humanitarian assistance in order to help save civilian lives,
PP13 Recalling the need for all parties to respect the relevant provisions of international humanitarian law and the United Nations guiding principles of humanitarian emergency assistance,
PP14 Expressing grave concern at the more than 3.2 million refugees, including more than 2.5 million women and children, who have fled Syria as a result of ongoing violence, and recognizing that the continued deterioration of the humanitarian situation in Syria is further contributing to the movement of refugees and poses risks to regional stability,
PP15 Reiterating its deep appreciation for the significant and admirable efforts that have been made by the countries of the region, notably Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Iraq and Egypt, to accommodate Syrian refugees, including the approximately 400,000 refugees who have fled Syria since the adoption of resolution 2165 (2014), and mindful of the immense costs and social challenges incurred by these countries as a consequence of the crisis,
PP16 Noting with concern that the international response to the Syrian and regional crisis continues to fall short of meeting the needs as assessed by host governments and the United Nations, therefore urging once again all Member States, based on burden-sharing principles, to support the United Nations and the countries of the region, including by adopting medium and long-term responses to alleviate the impact on communities, providing increased, flexible and predictable funding as well as increasing resettlement efforts, and taking note in this regard of the Berlin Communiqué of 28 October 2014,
PP17 Noting with grave concern that impunity in Syria contributes to widespread violations and abuses of human rights and violations of international humanitarian law, stressing the need to end impunity for these violations and abuses, and re-emphasizing in this regard the need that those who have committed or are otherwise responsible for such violations and abuses in Syria must be brought to justice,
PP18 Emphasizing that the humanitarian situation will continue to deteriorate further in the absence of a political solution to the crisis,
PP19 Determining that the deteriorating humanitarian situation in Syria continues to constitute a threat to peace and security in the region,
PP20 Underscoring that Member States are obligated under Article 25 of the Charter of the United Nations to accept and carry out the Council’s decisions,
  1. Demands that all parties to the Syrian domestic conflict, in particular the Syrian authorities, immediately comply with their obligations under international humanitarian law and international human rights law, and fully and immediately implement all the provisions of Security Council resolutions 2139 (2014) and 2165 (2014) and the Presidential Statement of 2 October 2013 (S/PRST/2013/15), and recalls that some of the violations and abuses committed in Syria may amount to war crimes and crimes against humanity;
  2. Decides to renew the decisions in paragraphs two and three of Security Council resolution 2165 (2014) for a period of twelve months, that is, until 10 January 2016;
  3. Decides to conduct six months after the renewal of these decisions a review of the implementation of paragraph two of this resolution;
  4. Expresses its full support for the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Syria, Mr. Staffan de Mistura, looks forward in particular to further advice from the Special Envoy concerning his proposals aimed at reducing violence, including through the implementation of freeze zones, emphasizes that if the violence in Syria continues to escalate, the humanitarian situation will continue to worsen, and reiterates that the only sustainable solution to the current crisis in Syria is through an inclusive and Syrian-led political process that meets the legitimate aspirations of the Syrian people, with a view to full implementation of the Geneva Communiqué of 30 June 2012 endorsed as Annex II of its resolution 2118 (2013);
  5. Requests the Secretary-General to report to the Council on the implementation of this resolution, and on compliance by all parties to the Syrian domestic conflict, within the framework of its reporting on resolutions 2139 (2014) and 2165 (2014);
  6. Reaffirms that it will take further measures under the Charter of the United Nations in the event of non-compliance with this resolution or resolution 2139 (2014) or 2165 (2014) by any party to the Syrian domestic conflict;
  7. Decides to remain actively seized of the matter. 

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Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Security Council condemns murder of Kassig, ISIL crimes

Security Council Press Statement on ISIL killings


The members of the Security Council strongly condemned the heinous and cowardly murders of U.S. humanitarian aid worker Abdul-Rahman Kassig, also known as Peter Kassig, and at least 15 Syrian captives by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).   The members of the Security Council expressed their deep sympathy and condolences to the families of the victims and to the peoples of the United States and Syria.  These crimes once again demonstrate the brutality of ISIL, which is responsible for thousands of abuses against the Syrian and Iraqi people. 

Regarding Mr. Kassig, the members of the Security Council noted that his murder is a tragic reminder of the increasing dangers humanitarian personnel face every day in Syria.  The members of the Security Council recalled United Nations Security Council resolution 2175 (2014) and their demand that all parties involved in an armed conflict comply fully with the obligations applicable to them under international humanitarian law, including to respect and protect all humanitarian personnel.  The members of the Security Council also recalled their condemnation of all forms of violence and intimidation to which those participating in humanitarian operations are increasingly exposed.

The members of the Security Council stressed again that ISIL must be defeated and that the intolerance, violence, and hatred it espouses must be stamped out.  The members of the Security Council further emphasized that such continued acts of barbarism perpetrated by ISIL do not intimidate them, but rather stiffen their resolve that there has to be a common effort among Governments and institutions, including those in the region most affected, to counter ISIL, Al-Nusra Front and all other individuals, groups, undertakings and entities associated with Al-Qaida, as the Council resolved in United Nations Security Council resolution 2170 (2014).

The members of the Security Council demanded the immediate, safe and unconditional release of all those who are kept hostage by ISIL, Al-Nusra Front, and all other individuals, groups, undertakings, and entities associated with Al-Qaida.

The members of the Security Council underlined the need to bring perpetrators of these reprehensible acts of terrorism to justice.  The members of the Security Council stressed that those responsible for the killing of Abdul-Rahman Kassig and the Syrian captives shall be held accountable, and urged all States, in accordance with their obligations under international law and relevant Security Council resolutions, to cooperate actively in this regard.

The members of the Security Council reaffirmed the need to combat by all means, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts, and that any acts of terrorism are criminal and unjustifiable, regardless of their motivation, wherever, whenever and by whomsoever committed.
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Friday, November 7, 2014

Yemen Sanctions Committee: Saleh, 2 Houthi leaders are subject to assets freeze travel ban

7 NOVEMBER 2014
SC/11636

Security Council 2140 Sanctions Committee Designates Three Individuals as Subject to Assets Freeze, Travel Ban


On 7 November 2014, the Security Council’s 2140 Sanctions Committee designated three individuals as subject to the assets freeze and travel ban measures outlined, respectively, in paragraphs 11 and 15 of Security Council resolution 2140 (2014), adopted under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations.
The Committee stresses the need for robust implementation of the Sanctions as an important tool in achieving a peaceful, inclusive, orderly and Yemeni-led political transition process.
As a result of the new listings, the Committee reminds Member States of their obligations under resolution 2140 (2014) to ensure that any funds, financial assets or economic resources are prevented from being made available by their nationals or by any individuals or entities within their territories, to or for the benefit of the individuals designated by the Committee; and their obligation to take the necessary measures to prevent the entry into or transit through their territories of the individuals designated by the Committee.
The details of the new listings are listed below:
YEi.001  Name: 1: ABD 2: AL-KHALIQ 3: AL-HUTHI 4: na  Name (original script):  Title: Designation: Huthi military commander DOB: 1984 POB: na Good quality a.k.a.: a) Abd-al-Khaliq al-Huthi b) Abd-al-Khaliq Badr-al-Din al Huthi c) ‘Abd al-Khaliq Badr al-Din al-Huthi Low quality a.k.a.: Abu-Yunus Nationality: Yemen Passport no.: na National identification no.: na Address: na Listed on: 7 Nov. 2014 Other information: Gender [Male].
Narrative summary of reasons for listing
Date on which narrative summary became available on the Committee’s website: 7 November 2014
Abd al-Khaliq al-Huthi was designated for sanctions on 7 November 2014 pursuant to paragraphs 11 and 15 of resolution 2140 (2014), as meeting the designation criteria set out in paragraphs 17 and 18 of the resolution.
Additional information
Abd al-Khaliq al-Huthi has engaged in acts that threaten the peace, security, or stability of Yemen, such as acts that obstruct the implementation of the agreement of 23 November 2011 between the Government of Yemen and those in opposition to it, which provides for a peaceful transition of power in Yemen, and acts that obstruct the political process in Yemen.
In late October 2013, Abd al-Khaliq al-Huthi led a group of fighters dressed in Yemeni military uniforms in an attack on locations in Dimaj, Yemen.  The ensuing fighting resulted in multiple deaths.
In late September 2014, an unknown number of unidentified fighters allegedly were prepared to attack diplomatic facilities in Sana’a, Yemen, upon receiving orders from the Abd al-Khaliq al-Huthi.  On 30 August 2014, al-Huthi coordinated to move weapons from Amran to a protest camp in Sana’a.
YEi.002  Name: 1: ABDULLAH 2: YAHYA 3: AL HAKIM 4: na  Name (original script):  Title: Designation: Huthi group second-in-command DOB: a) Approximately 1985 b) Between 1984 and 1986 POB: a) Dahyan, Yemen b) Sa’dah Governorate, Yemen Good quality a.k.a.: a)Abu Ali al Hakim b) Abu-Ali al-Hakim c) Abdallah al-Hakim d) Abu Ali Alhakim e) Abdallah al-Mu’ayyad Low quality a.k.a.: na Nationality: Yemen Passport no.: na National identification no.: na Address: Dahyan, Sa’dah Governorate, Yemen Listed on: 7 Nov. 2014 Other information: Gender [Male].
Narrative summary of reasons for listing
Date on which narrative summary became available on the Committee’s website: 7 November 2014
Abdullah Yahya al Hakim was designated for sanctions on 7 November 2014 pursuant to paragraphs 11 and 15 of resolution 2140 (2014), as meeting the designation criteria set out in paragraphs 17 and 18 of the resolution.
Additional information
Abdullah Yahya al Hakim has engaged in acts that threaten the peace, security, or stability of Yemen, such as acts that obstruct the implementation of the agreement of 23 November 2011, between the Government of Yemen and those in opposition to it, which provides for a peaceful transition of power in Yemen, and that obstruct the political process in Yemen.
In June 2014, Abdullah Yahya al Hakim reportedly held a meeting in order to plot a coup against Yemeni President Abdrabuh Mansour Hadi.  Al Hakim met with military and security commanders, and tribal chieftains; leading partisan figures loyal to former Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh also attended the meeting, which aimed to coordinate military efforts to take over Sana’a, Yemen’s capital.
In a 29 August 2014 public statement, the President of the United Nations Security Council stated that the Council condemned the actions of forces commanded by Abdullah Yahya al Hakim who overran Amran, Yemen, including the Yemeni Army Brigade headquarters on 8 July 2014.  Al Hakim led the July 2014 violent takeover of the Amran Governorate and was the military commander responsible for making decisions regarding ongoing conflicts in the Amran Governorate and Hamdan, Yemen.
As of early September 2014, Abdullah Yahya al Hakim remained in Sana’a to oversee combat operations in case fighting began.  His role was to organize military operations so as to be able to topple the Yemeni Government, and he was also responsible for securing and controlling all routes in and out of Sana’a.
YEi.003  Name: 1: ALI 2: ABDULLAH 3: SALEH 4: na  Name (original script):  Title: Designation: a) President of Yemen’s General People’s Congress party b) Former President of the Republic of Yemen DOB: a) 21 Mar. 1945 b) 21 Mar. 1946 c) 21 Mar. 1942 POB: a)Bayt al-Ahmar, Sana’a Governorate, Yemen b) Sana’a, Yemen Good quality a.k.a.: Ali Abdallah Salih Low quality a.k.a.: na Nationality: Yemen Passport no.: 00016161 (Yemen) National identification no.: na Address: na Listed on: 7 Nov. 2014 Other information: Gender [Male].
Narrative summary of reasons for listing
Date on which narrative summary became available on the Committee’s website: 7 November 2014
Ali Abdullah Saleh was designated for sanctions on 7 November 2014 pursuant to paragraphs 11 and 15 of resolution 2140 (2014), as meeting the designation criteria set out in paragraphs 17 and 18 of the resolution.
Additional information
Ali Abdullah Saleh has engaged in acts that threaten the peace, security, or stability of Yemen, such as acts that obstruct the implementation of the agreement of 23 November 2011 between the Government of Yemen and those in opposition to it, which provides for a peaceful transition of power in Yemen, and acts that obstruct the political process in Yemen.
Per the 23 November 2011 agreement backed by the Gulf Cooperation Council, Ali Abdullah Saleh stepped down as President of Yemen after more than 30 years.
As of fall 2012, Ali Abdullah Saleh had reportedly become one of the primary supporters of violent Huthi actions in northern Yemen.
More recently, as of September 2014, Saleh has been destabilizing Yemen by using others to undermine the central government and create enough instability to threaten a coup.  According to a September 2014 report by the United Nations Panel of Experts for Yemen, interlocutors alleged that Saleh supports violent actions of some Yemenis by providing them funds and political support, as well as ensuring that GPC members continue to contribute to the destabilization of Yemen through various means.
The September 2014 United Nations Panel of Experts report on Yemen also states that allegations have been made that Ali Abdullah Saleh has been using Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) operatives to conduct assassinations and attacks against military installations in order to weaken President Hadi and create discontent within the army and broader Yemeni population.  Clashes in the south of Yemen in February 2013 were a result of the combined efforts of Saleh, AQAP, and southern secessionist Ali Salim al-Bayd to cause trouble before the 18 March 2013 National Dialogue Conference in Yemen.
The Committee’s sanctions list is available on its website at the following URL:http://www.un.org/sc/committees/2140/.  The Committee will update regularly its list when it has agreed to include or delete relevant information in accordance with the procedures set out in its Guidelines.

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Internal memo: Sanctions Committee on Yemen adopts sanctions against former president Saleh, 2 Houthi leaders

SECURITY COUNCIL COMMITTEE ESTABLISHED            S/AC.56/2014/NOTE.28/Add.3
PURSUANT TO RESOLUTION 2140 (2014)                             7 November 2014

Note by the Chair

The Chair of the Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 2140 (2014) presents her compliments to the members of the Committee.

In reference to the letter dated 31 October 2014 from the United States Mission to the United Nations, proposing the designation of three individuals as subject to the assets freeze and travel ban measures outlined, respectively, in paragraphs 11 and 15, of resolution 2140 (2014), together with a corresponding press release, circulated under Note S/AC.56/2014/NOTE.28 of 31 October 2014, the Chair wishes to inform the members that no holds or objections were placed by the set deadline of Friday, 7 November 2014, 5:00 p.m. for the consideration of the proposed designations.

Consequently, the proposed designations are approved and the Chair will instruct the Secretariat to proceed with making the Committee List together with the corresponding narrative summaries available on the Committee website, issuing the press release, as revised, informing Member States about the List, and notifying the Permanent Mission of Yemen to the United Nations of the listing, in accordance with, respectively, paragraphs 6(c), 5(g), 5(h) and 5(i) of the Committee’s Guidelines.


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US letter to Security Council: Saleh uses Al-Qa’ida to conduct assassinations in Yemen

(Copy) 
UNITED STATES MISSION TO THE UNITED NATIONS
October 31, 2014
Dear Madam Ambassador:

The U.S. Mission to the United Nations informs the Committee pursuant to resolutions 2140 (2014) that the following individuals have been identified pursuant to paragraph 17 of resolution 2140 (2014) as engaging in or providing support for acts that threaten the peace, security or stability of Yemen: Former President Ali Saleh, Abd alKhaliq al Huthi, Abdullah Yahya al Hakim. We request that these individuals be added to the 2140 (2014) Sanctions List.
 We have provided detailed information on the reasons behind our request for inclusion on the list in the attached statement of case.

           Please accept, Excellency, the assurances of my highest consideration.
                                                                                                 Sincerely,
...

(U) Statement of the Case: Ali Abdullah Saleh

(U) Name: Ali Abdullah Saleh
(U) Also Known As: Ali Abdallah Salih
(U) Gender: Male
(U//FOUO) Date of Birth: March 21, 1945
(U) Alternate Date of Birth: March 21, 1946
(U) Alternate Date of Birth: March 21, 1942
(U) Place of Birth: Bayt al-Ahmar, Sana’a Governorate, Yemen
(U//FOUO) Alternate Place of Birth: Sana’a, Yemen
(U//FOUO) Nationality: Yemen
(U//FOUO) Passport: 00016161 (Yemen)
(U//FOUO) Position: President of Yemen’s General People’s Congress party
(U) Alternate Position: Former President of the Republic of Yemen

(U) Per the November 23, 2011 Gulf Cooperation Council agreement, Ali Abdullah Saleh stepped down as President of Yemen after more than 30 years and transferred power to his Vice President, Abd Rabbo Mansour Hadi.  Although Saleh is no longer President, he retains considerable influence in Yemen’s politics as head of the country’s ruling party, the General People’s Congress (GPC).

(U) Ali Abdullah Saleh has engaged in acts that directly or indirectly threaten the peace, security, or stability of Yemen, such as acts that obstruct the implementation of the agreement of November 23, 2011, between the Government of Yemen and those in opposition to it, which provides for a peaceful transition of power in Yemen, or that obstruct the political process in Yemen. 

(U) As of fall 2012, Ali Abdullah Saleh had reportedly become one of the primary supporters of the Huthi rebellion.  Saleh was behind the attempts to cause chaos throughout Yemen.  More recently, as of September 2014, Saleh is reportedly inciting instability in Yemen by using the Huthi (or “Ansar Allah”) dissident group to not only delegitimize the central government, but also create enough instability to stage a coup.  According to a September 2014 United Nations Panel of Experts report on Yemen, Saleh supports the Huthis by providing them funds and political support, as well as ensuring that GPC members do nothing to hinder the Huthis in achieving their objectives.  Although Saleh was provided an opportunity to respond to these allegations, as described in the Panel of Experts report, he has merely denounced them without providing explanations.  Saleh’s strategy in these activities appears to be aimed at demonstrating that President Hadi is a failed President.

(U) The September 2014 United Nations Panel of Experts report on Yemen also alleges that Ali Abdullah Saleh has been using Al-Qa’ida in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) operatives to conduct assassinations against individuals and attacks against military installations in order to further weaken President Hadi and sow discontent within the army and population.   Clashes in the south of Yemen in February 2013 were a result of the combined efforts of Saleh, AQAP, Iran, and key southern secessionist ‘Ali Salim al-Bayd to cause trouble before the March 18, 2013 National Dialogue Conference in Yemen.


(U) Statement of the Case: Abd al-Khaliq al-Huthi

(U) Primary Name: Abd al-Khaliq al-Huthi
(U) Also Known As: Abd-al-Khaliq al-Huthi
(U) Also Known As: Abu-Yunus
(U) Also Known As: Abd-al-Khaliq Badr-al-Din al Huthi
(U) Also Known As: ‘Abd al-Khaliq Badr al-Din al-Huthi
(U) Gender: Male
(U) Date of Birth: 1984
(U) Position: Huthi military commander

(U) Abd al-Khaliq al-Huthi has engaged in acts that directly or indirectly threaten the peace, security, or stability of Yemen, such as acts that obstruct the implementation of the agreement of November 23, 2011, between the Government of Yemen and those in opposition to it, which provides for a peaceful transition of power in Yemen, or that obstruct the political process in Yemen.  Al-Huthi is a military leader of the Huthi group, an entity that has engaged in acts that obstruct the implementation of the agreement of November 23, 2011 between the Government of Yemen and those in opposition to it, which provides for a peaceful transition of power in Yemen, or that obstruct the political process in Yemen.

(U) In late October 2013, Abd al-Khaliq al-Huthi led a group of Huthi fighters dressed in Yemeni military uniforms in an attack on locations in Dimaj (Yemen) which were controlled by Salafis.  The ensuing fighting resulted in multiple deaths on both sides.

(U) In August 2014, the U.S. Department of State strongly condemned the Huthis (also known as “Ansar Allah”) for actions taken to undermine the Gulf Cooperation Council political transition process and Yemen’s stability.  Specifically, the U.S. condemned the Huthi’s “provocative, aggressive, and destabilizing actions and incitement against the Government of Yemen, the establishment of armed camps in and around Sana’a, and their continued illegitimate control of Amran.”

(U) In late September 2014, an unknown number of unidentified Huthi movement fighters allegedly were prepared to attack the U.S. Embassy in Sana’a, Yemen, upon receiving orders from Huthi military commander of Sana’a, Abd al-Khaliq al-Huthi.  In fall 2014, Al-Huthi was interested in moving explosives within Yemen.  On August 30, 2014, al-Huthi coordinated with the Huthis in Amran, Yemen, to move weapons from Amran to a Huthi protest camp in Sana’a.


(U) Statement of the Case: Abdullah Yahya al Hakim
  
(U) Primary Name: Abdullah Yahya al Hakim
(U) Also Known As: Abu Ali al Hakim
(U) Also Known As: Abu-Ali al-Hakim
(U) Also Known As: Abdallah al-Hakim
(U//FOUO) Also Known As: Abu Ali Alhakim
(U) Also Known As: Abdallah al-Mu’ayyad
(U) Gender: Male
(U) Date of Birth: circa 1985
(U) Alternate Date of Birth: 1984-1986
(U//FOUO) Place of Birth: Dahyan, Yemen
(U) Alternate Place of Birth: Sa’dah Governorate, Yemen
(U//FOUO) Nationality: Yemen
(U) Address: Dahyan, Sa’dah Governorate, Yemen
(U) Position: Huthi group second-in-command


(U) Abdullah Yahya al Hakim has engaged in acts that directly or indirectly threaten the peace, security, or stability of Yemen, such as acts that obstruct the implementation of the agreement of November 23, 2011, between the Government of Yemen and those in opposition to it, which provides for a peaceful transition of power in Yemen, or that obstruct the political process in Yemen.  In addition, al Hakim is a military or political leader of the Huthi group (also known as “Ansar Allah”), an entity that has engaged in acts that obstruct the implementation of the agreement of November 23, 2011 between the Government of Yemen and those in opposition to it, which provides for a peaceful transition of power in Yemen, or that obstruct the political process in Yemen.

(U) Abdullah Yahya al Hakim gained prominence as a Huthi military commander following the Huthi takeover of the al-Ahmar homes in Hashid (Yemen) in January and February 2014.

(U) In June 2014, Abdullah Yahya al Hakim – the Huthi group’s second-in-command – reportedly held a meeting in order to plot a coup against Yemeni President Abdrabuh Mansour Hadi.  Al Hakim met with military and security commanders, tribal chieftains, and officials, and leading partisan figures loyal to former Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh also attended the meeting, which aimed to coordinate efforts to take over Sana’a.

(U) In an August 29, 2014 public statement, the President of the United Nations Security Council condemned the actions of Huthi forces commanded by Abdullah Yahya al Hakim, who overran Amran (Yemen), including the Yemeni Army Brigade headquarters on July 8, 2014.  Al Hakim led the Huthi group’s July 2014 takeover of the Amran Governorate.  Al Hakim was the Huthi military commander responsible for making decisions regarding the Huthis’ ongoing conflicts in the Amran Governorate and Hamdan (Yemen).  On July 3, 2014, al Hakim reportedly told the Presidential Committee tasked with the supervision of the implementation of the ceasefire agreement in the Amran Governorate that the Huthi fighters would not withdraw from the positions and checkpoints under their control in the Amran Governorate, Hamdan District, and other areas in Bani Matar, Yemen. 

(U) In August 2014, the U.S. Department of State strongly condemned the Huthis for actions taken to undermine the Gulf Cooperation Council political transition process and Yemen’s stability.  Specifically, the U.S. condemned the Huthi’s “provocative, aggressive, and destabilizing actions and incitement against the Government of Yemen, the establishment of armed camps in and around Sana’a, and their continued illegitimate control of Amran.”

(U) As of early September 2014, Huthi military commander Abdullah Yahya al Hakim remained in Sana’a (Yemen) to oversee combat operations in case fighting began.  Al Hakim’s role was to organize Huthi military operations so as to be able to topple the Yemeni government on the order of Huthi leader ‘Abd al-Malik al-Huthi.  Al Hakim was responsible for securing and controlling all routes in and out of Sana’a.  He commanded a Huthi unit of about 300 persons paid to fight the Yemeni government.
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